While on a quest on an online shopping site to find jumper cables for my car, I came across a mechanical keyboard from a company called Havit. I saw that it was relatively cheap compared to other mechanical keyboards I’ve seen, so I decided to buy it for the heck of it.

I’ve used mechanical keyboards before. I used them in the late 80s, right after I switched from the Apple II to a PC running an 8088 processor. They were the norm back then. Then, in the mid 90s, keyboard manufacturers switched to using membranes to save on cost.

The resurgence of mechanical keyboards, I believe, is due to its popularity with gamers. They enjoyed the responsive action, tactile feedback, multiple key input capabilities and the “clicky” sound that only these could give.

This particular keyboard, the HV-KB435L, is what’s known as a “Tenkeyless” or “TKL” keyboard. It doesn’t have the number pad. This makes for better portability for LAN parties, and allows better positioning of the mouse for users with limited space.

The keyboard uses the standard US QWERTY layout, which I like. Other cheap mechanical keyboards I’ve found all use the European layout with the large “Enter” key. It also feels rather solid, thanks to a metal top cover that prevents it from flexing when you type. The 1.75m cable is covered with a braided fabric and ends with a gold plated USB connector.

The keys on this keyboard use blue mechanical switches. From what I can tell, they’re from Otemu. They’re similar to the Cherry MX blue switches found on higher end keyboards. As expected when you press on them, you get sharp tactile feedback and a very audible “click”. It can be a bit loud if you’re concerned with other people hearing you type. Yet, noise aside, there’s a satisfaction that you get from it. I did have to get used to playing games on it. There is a feel difference.

I’m not a fan of the keycaps. Although they feel good and smooth to the touch, the font they used is awful. It’s stylized in a way to look “gaming”, but it isn’t very legible. They’re backlit with RGB lighting, also because “gaming”.

I’m not a fan of the RGB trend. I’d rather have a single color for the backlight. That said, this keyboard runs with RGB backlighting and has eight different lighting effects that you can cycle through. It also allows you to save three custom lighting schemes that you may want to use for specific games or applications.

Havit has a winner with the HV-KB435L Tenkeyless keyboard. At the time I got it, it was PhP 1,149.00. That’s a great bargain. It’s a little more expensive now, but it’s still worth it. I’ve been using the keyboard for about five months already. It’s holding up, still feels great to type on, and works really well for gaming. Personally, I wouldn’t mind ditching the RGB lighting and changing the font of the keys. Despite that, I still don’t mind recommending it to someone looking for a good value mechanical keyboard. I’m pretty happy with it.

Havit Gamenote KB435L Mechanical Keyboard


It can be a bit loud if you’re concerned with other people hearing you type. Yet, noise aside, there’s a satisfaction that you get from it.


The keyboard uses the standard US QWERTY layout, which I like. Other cheap mechanical keyboards I’ve found all use the European layout with the large “Enter” key. It also feels rather solid, thanks to a metal top cover that prevents it from flexing when you type. The 1.75m cable is covered with a braided fabric and ends with a gold plated USB connector.

The keys on this keyboard use blue mechanical switches. From what I can tell, they’re from Otemu. They’re similar to the Cherry MX blue switches found on higher end keyboards. As expected when you press on them, you get sharp tactile feedback and a very audible “click”. It can be a bit loud if you’re concerned with other people hearing you type. Yet, noise aside, there’s a satisfaction that you get from it. I did have to get used to playing games on it. There is a feel difference.

I’m not a fan of the keycaps. Although they feel good and smooth to the touch, the font they used is awful. It’s stylized in a way to look “gaming”, but it isn’t very legible. They’re backlit with RGB lighting, also because “gaming”.

I’m not a fan of the RGB trend. I’d rather have a single color for the backlight. That said, this keyboard runs with RGB backlighting and has eight different lighting effects that you can cycle through. It also allows you to save three custom lighting schemes that you may want to use for specific games or applications.

Havit has a winner with the HV-KB435L Tenkeyless keyboard. At the time I got it, it was PhP 1,149.00. That’s a great bargain. It’s a little more expensive now, but it’s still worth it. I’ve been using the keyboard for about five months already. It’s holding up, still feels great to type on, and works really well for gaming. Personally, I wouldn’t mind ditching the RGB lighting and changing the font of the keys. Despite that, I still don’t mind recommending it to someone looking for a good value mechanical keyboard. I’m pretty happy with it.


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